CD

THE 4 SEASONS AND OTHER TANGOS

Otoño Porteño, Invierno Porteño, Primavera Porteña, Verano Porteño, Prepárense, Oblivion, Revirado, Adiós Nonino

€18,00

  • Artist(s): Ensemble Tangueando | Giovanni Miszczyszyn, flute | Ezio Borghese, bandoneon | Enrico Gianino, piano
  • Period: 20th Century
  • Catalogue No.: C00016
  • Barcode: 0793597061928

Piazzolla, Mirto, Granados, Patzleiner, Albéniz, Brouwer, Careddu: ENDLESS JOURNEYS

Piazzolla: Oblivion | Mirto: Omar | Granados: Oriental, Danzas Espanolas, n.2 | Patzleiner: Dona la pace Patzleiner: Ave Maria Dixie | Albéniz: Granada | Brouwer: Un Dia de Noviémbre | Careddu: Romy, Elena

€18,00

SCORE

 

Libertango, for violin quartet

(Arr. By Erzhan Kulibaev) DV 20578 24 Pages Contemporary

€18,90

Shipping cost not included

 

Libertango, for violin quartet

(Arr. By Erzhan Kulibaev) DV 20578P \ Contemporary

€20,90

Shipping cost not included

(b Mar del Plata, 11 March 1921; d Buenos Aires, 5 July 1992). Argentine composer, bandleader and bandoneón player. A child prodigy on the bandoneón, Piazzolla and his family emigrated to New York in 1924; in his teens he became acquainted with Gardel, for whom he worked as a tour guide, translator and occasional performer. Piazzolla returned to Buenos Aires in 1937 where he gave concerts and made tango arrangements for Aníbal Troilo, a leading bandleader; he also studied classical music with Ginastera. In 1944 Piazzolla left Troilo’s band to form the Orquesta del 46 as a vehicle for his own compositions. A symphony composed in 1954 for the Buenos Aires PO won him a scholarship to study in Paris with Boulanger, who encouraged him in the composition of tangos; the following year he resettled in Argentina and formed the Octeto Buenos Aires and, later, the Quinteto Nuevo Tango, which performed at his own club, Jamaica. Piazzolla left Argentina in 1974, settling in Paris, where he composed a concerto for bandoneón and a cello sonata for Rostropovich, among other works.
Piazzolla’s distinctive brand of tango, later called ‘nuevo tango’, initially met with resistance. Including fugue, extreme chromaticism, dissonance, elements of jazz and, at times, expanded instrumentation, it was condemned by the old-guard, including not only most tango composers and bandleaders but also Borges, whose short story El hombre de la Esquina Rosada was the basis for Piazzolla’s El tango (1969); like tango itself, Piazzolla’s work first found general approval outside Argentina, principally in France and the USA. By the 1980s, however, Piazzolla’s music was widely accepted even in his native country, where he was now seen as the saviour of tango, which during the 1950s and 60s had declined in popularity and appeal. In the late 1980s Piazzolla’s works began to be taken up by classical performers, in particular the Kronos Quartet, who commissioned Five Tango Sensations (1989). In all he composed about 750 works, including film scores for Tangos: the Exile of Gardel (1985) and Sur (1987). Shortly before his death, he was commissioned to write an opera on the life of Gardel.

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